Elderly multimillionaire nearly dies of neglect


(wsbtv.com)

CLAYTON COUNTY, Ga. — Police are investigating a case of elder abuse in which officers suspect the victim's caretakers stole her money to pay for college tuition. Patricia Neville, 75, lives in Jonesboro, Georgia. When police found her in her home last October, she had life­ threatening wounds too graphic to describe.

Police arrested three people who had been hired to take care of her, but instead, may have neglected her. 

"She was near death. She was near death," conservator Elizabeth Williams Winfield said. Winfield said when she was appointed by the courts last November to be the conservator of Neville's estate, Neville was in poor health.

Continue Reading

Aging Matters: Abuse & Exploitation

(Nashville Public Broadcasting)

It is estimated that one in ten adults over the age of 60 is a victim.  But the truth is we don’t know for certain how many older adults are suffering from abuse. In the eighth edition of Aging Matters, Nashville Public Television explores the issues behind elder abuse, neglect and exploitation. 

Experts suggest that our understanding of elder abuse lies decades behind that of child abuse and domestic violence. Elder abuse is underreported. It lacks clear legal definition and is complicated by ethical challenges.  The system of response is different depending on where you live.

What are the risk factors, what can we do to protect ourselves and our loved ones, and what is our responsibility to intervene for those in need? The questions are simple, but the answers are not.  Find out more in Aging Matters – Abuse & Exploitation. Watch the Documentary

*Georgia Division of Aging Services' Sharee Rines is a panelist in the video. 

Helpless patients live hidden away in filth as caretakers pocket pay from Medicaid


(The Telegraph)

An Alaska man developed gangrenous toes. A Philadelphia woman froze to death on the street. An Illinois woman died emaciated, covered in excrement.

These patients suffered as their government-paid caretakers neglected them, collecting paychecks under a Medicaid program that gives elderly and disabled people non-medical assistance at home. In some cases, the caretakers convicted of neglect were the victims’ own family members.

The Personal Care Services program, which exceeded $14.5 billion in fiscal year 2014, is rife with financial scams, some of which threaten patient safety, according to a recent report from the Office of Inspector General at the Department of Health and Human Services. Continue Reading